Monday, November 21, 2016

Trump Election Gives America a Front-Row Seat to See Liberalism on Display

RUSH:  It's exactly what I said was gonna happen on Friday, folks.  The arrogant condescension of the American left is now on display for everybody to see it.  People that used to pay no attention to it, people that used to not even notice it, people that never knew what liberalism is are now getting a front-row seat to finding out exactly who they are and what they are and what they do and how they do it. 
Greetings, my friends.  Great to have you.  I hope you had a great weekend.  Rush Limbaugh here behind the Golden EIB Microphone for yet another three-hour excursion into broadcast excellence. 
My first observation about the Hamilton episode with Mike Pence, I don't think the cast of this show has the slightest idea who Alexander Hamilton is.  I frankly think they know their lines and that's it.  And that's typical liberalism.  They know the lines that have been written for 'em, but they don't know the man, they don't know the history, they think they know what they're talking about.  They think they're authorities. Just like an actress who will play a farm wife in a movie in a Great Depression farm era will be called to the Senate to testify about dire straits on the American farm, when she had no idea.  She played it in a movie. 
Well, these clowns in Hamilton are playing a role.  They have their lines, their sing their lines in their songs, and that's it.  And they think they are experts. And then you add to it that they are liberals, and that makes them think they are experts and then you add the arrogance and condescending nature of liberalism and you have a totally offensive manner of behavior. 
One of the especially hilarious parts of the cast of Hamilton lecturing Mike Pence was all their talk of diversity and how scared they are because, you know, they're all gay or they're all transgender or they're all lesbian and Mike Pence and Trump are coming for 'em and we don't want to be put in the camps, please don't put us in the camps!  They literally think this because this is how they've been educated, it's how they've been taught. They really do think this stuff, folks.  Just like they think the planet isn't going to be habitable by the time they're 65.  I can't emphasize this enough.  They believe this stuff.  But not only do they believe it, they think they're the only ones who know it and that makes them experts in this stuff. 
Now, their talk of diversity, I don't know if you've heard this about this show, Hamilton, the producers of Hamilton got into trouble back in March because their casting call for an upcoming touring company specifically stated that they were seeking nonwhite performers.  They did not want anybody but people of color in the cast in one of the touring companies of this show.  It's against the rules of Actors Equity.  It's against state law.  It's against federal law.  But somehow everybody has forgotten about that.  Somehow it was never investigated by the Department of Justice, Obama, or anybody else. 
I once appeared on Broadway.  Tell you a little story.  The Will Rogers Follies were playing on Broadway. It was a musical and it had as part of the show Wiley Post, the ghost of Wiley Post, who was the pilot, he was Will Rogers' great friend and pilot.  They died in a plane crash.  And during the play the ghost of Wiley Post, seated in the audience, would stand up and repeat a couple of lines, and the actor playing Will Rogers would react, and it was a revolving door.  The people they asked to play the ghost of Wiley Post sitting in the crowd, sitting in the audience, it changed every night.  It was an honor. 
And I was invited to be the ghost of Wiley Post one night.  Mac Davis was the star as Will Rogers.  In fact, every time I go out to play golf in Los Angeles I run into Mac Davis on the golf course.  Whenever he sees me, "Hey, Wiley!"  That's how he knows me, as Wiley.  We'll sit down and have a drink and he'll talk to me about Wiley.  (laughing)
Anyway, it went fine.  I stood up and I repeated my lines during the show.  The audience always looked.  It was up in the balcony where the ghost of Wiley Post sat, and the audience every night looked up to see who was portraying the ghost of Wiley Post.  So after the show I went backstage, one of the people with the play had invited me backstage to meet people, and it was very icy back there, which I thought would be the case.  I mean, it's a New York theater crowd, very icy, very cold back there, but nobody said anything.  They just looked at me and harrumphed or looked away or looked irritated or whatever.  But the guy shepherding me through it was a great guy, very nice guy, introduced me to a few people.
I walked out the stage entrance, the private entrance the actors and actresses used to get in and out of the theater.  And there were four or five members of the cast waiting for me when I exited the back door.  And they started yelling, "We didn't want to go on stage tonight knowing you were here.  We do not agree with anything you say.  We think you want to hurt us." 
Now, I am just totally taken aback by this.  Remember, this is the early nineties, so it's many, many moons ago, and there was one member of the cast, a woman, started pooh-poohing, "Oh, shut up. Take it somewhere else and leave us alone."  She happened to be a big fan and was talking to me out there, and she started laughing at them, which made them even angrier.  But it was five or six of them, they had waited out there for me to exit to make that point. 
So this is actually nothing new.  But it's instructive, folks.  It's entirely informative as to just what the left is, who the left is and everything about them that I have spent the last 29 years, going on 30, attempting to explain to people. And now the job has gotten much easier because by virtue of the election, these people have become more visible and more marginalized, and I do think it's a positive. 
I think it's a net positive for these people to behave as they're behaving and to be seen by people who in the normal course of events may not even think about people like this and the way they act.  They just pay it no attention.  Now you can't miss it.  So in many ways it's a positive.  In other ways you wish it would it wouldn't happened.  I mean, you wish this kind of division didn't exist in the country, but it does and it has for quite a while. 
The actor who spoke to Pence, Brandon Victor Davis, said, "We hope this show has inspired you."  You know what the show's about?  I mean, it's Hamilton.  It's about a vice president who shoots a political rival and gets away with it, Burr, in a duel.  Do you know that Alexander Hamilton was an immigration hawk?  I wonder if the people in this cast have any idea who they are lionizing and celebrating.  This guy's Donald Trump.  Alexander Hamilton was a huge nationalist.  He did not like states' rights.  He wanted a massive federal government. 
Thomas Jefferson and John Adams didn't like the guy at all.  They were agrarians, they were farmers, they believed in states' rights.  Alexander Hamilton, he didn't want anybody getting in the country he didn't personally approve of.  I mean, it's uncanny.  Well, he, yeah, he founded the New York Post.  The guy was amazing.  He was born out of wedlock.  He was born out of wedlock in the Caribbean.  He grew up in Nevis and St. Kitts.  He had a -- what would you call it in modern day terms, came from a broken family. It was in the Dutch West Indies where he grew up. 
He went to what were called the 13 colonies, he wanted to go to the 13 colonies to make his fame and fortune.  Do you know the Federalist Papers, the vast majority of the Federalist Papers are the best thing we have to interpret the Constitution.  The Federalist Papers, the short version of them, short definition, the Federalist Papers are where the founders explained their thoughts on practically every aspect of the Constitution, including what kind of person they envisioned as president. They get into things like the character of the executive and so forth.  It's very, very instructive.  Alexander Hamilton wrote the vast majority of it, James Madison the other.  James Madison is considered the father of the Constitution. 
But Alexander Hamilton was a profoundly unique individual, and I don't think he is at all the kind of guy the people in these cast would celebrate if they literally knew who he was.  I think they know their lines and that's it. They're dangerous this way.  Leftists are dangerous.  They're actors and they portray roles and they learn lines, and they think they are then experts. I mean, you see it still today. 
The entertainment media will go out and interview some actor that's just portrayed somebody famous, and that actor becomes an expert.  And we get to hear from the actor what they did to dig deep and learn the character and immerse themselves into it.  And as such they become, within our media, experts on either the character they're portraying or the subject line or storyline of whatever, the movie or TV show they are appearing in. 
But Alexander Hamilton was a primary influence on the U.S. Constitution.  He was the founder of the nation's financial system.  He founded the Federalist Party.  He founded the Coast Guard.  He founded the New York Post.  He was the first secretary of the Treasury under the first president, George Washington.  He was the author -- he was the economics guru -- for George Washington's first administration.  He was responsible...
The states were in considerable debt at the founding, and it was Alexander Hamilton who took the lead in having the federal government fund their debt.  He established a national bank, a system of tariffs, and he was very friendly with Britain in terms of trade, which angered the French, and it angered a bunch of his fellow Founding Fathers.  There was no love lost for the U.K -- well, it wasn't the U.K. For Britain.  But Hamilton did.  He believed in a vigorous president, a vigorous executive branch. 
National bank, national support for manufacturing, strong military.  He was not so much big on the states having independent power.  But this is the kind of thing that made our founding and makes our founding just absolutely -- I don't know -- fascinating to people that get into it.  And any rate, I submit that these clowns on Broadway don't even know who the guy really is, and they preach to Pence coming in. 
But the thing about this, folks, is when they say they're afraid, "you scare us," it's hard to understand, and it's easy to say, "Well, they're just making a political statement." But, in fact, I think there is a tremendous amount of fear on the part.  You look at college campuses and this whole snowflake phenomenon and the safe spaces areas and the, "Gee, I don't want to have anything controversial that I don't agree with be spoken. I don't want to have to hear it."  All that's real.  They have been protected. 
Like Daniel Hannan, the member of Parliament from the U.K. (a noted conservative and has become a famous face on American TV), has a piece, and he basically thinks that the modern-era left attitudinally is nothing more than a bunch of six- and seven-year-old children.  Now, they're not children when it comes to what their capabilities are, determining the action they take and the mean-spirited extremism they exhibit and so forth.  Attitudinally, they're kids.  He cites as an example all these anti-Trump protesters marching in front of Trump Tower. 
"Donald Trump, go away! Donald Trump go home! Donald Trump, go away!" 
He says they really don't expect Trump to come out and quit.  They don't expect Trump to leave. So what are they doing?  They're acting out their childhood impulses.  "Donald Trump, go away! Donald Trump..."  They're just a bunch of kids, except they're far more dangerous than kids because they're adults, but they have attitudes and mentality that's almost stunted as six- or seven-year-olds, because of the very protective way they've been raised and the lies that they have accepted, both in the news and the anecdotal lies that are passed around from people to people, person to person. 
And it's a challenge.  The thing is, we've all been worried that we were losing the country to this group of people.  We really were.  I mean, the last eight years everybody I talked to, myself included, asked, "Have we really lost the country?  I mean, is this...?" And we haven't.  We're not even close to it, as it turns out.  Well, that's not the best way to say it, 'cause we could lose it at any time.  The forces are out there trying to cause that to happen.  But we have not. Remember when I kept telling you, "I'll tell you when it's time to panic," and I told you it's not time to panic? 
It's never time to panic with this bunch because they were never really ever the majority.  It was just an illusion that we happened to believe, or that we feared was close to becoming reality.  At any rate, you want a great example of the...? I just think it's general stupidity.  I think the left is everything you're hearing people say. (chuckling) Oh, Alexander Hamilton, by the way? Get this. You know who invented the Electoral College?  Alexander Hamilton.  I'd forgotten to mention this. Yeah, Alexander Hamilton is the father of the Electoral College. 
In fact, Alexander Hamilton was one of the people begging George Washington to accept the role of king.  Alexander Hamilton believed in monarchy.  He thought monarchy was one of the most effective ways of government. As long as you had a morally decent person as the monarch, it was the best way to go.  And Washington refused. He said, "We didn't fight the war..." These are not his words, but he essentially said, "We didn't fight the war and all this to make somebody king here.  We just got through opposing a king and saw what tyrants become."  But, yeah, he was a big aristocrat. 
He loved the aristocracy, Hamilton. 
He wanted them to be... I mean, everything these people on stage profess to hate right now, he was there either creating, inventing, or founding.  That's why I say, "I don't think they have the slightest idea who the guy really was," and here they are highly acclaimed.  And it's a good show from what I hear.  I can't go to shows like this 'cause (sigh) I can't hear them.  My deafness.  I mean, I can hear it, but it doesn't make any sense to me what I am hearing. 
Anyway, try this headline: "Feminist Snowplowing System Brings Stockholm to a Standstill."  They're just stupid, folks.  They're entertaining if you stand back -- entertainingly humorous, stupid -- except they do destructive and damaging things, as I shall point out when we get back.
RUSH:  Democrat actors have been attacking Republican elected officials in theaters, I don't know what, since 1865. The first known instance of a radical leftist Democrat actor attacking a Republican elected official was John Wilkes Booth assassinating Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington, 1865.  So these guys at Hamilton are following in what I'm sure they consider to be a rich tradition.  But the condescension of thinking that they are telling the vice-president-elect how to do it, how to be, what to think.
And the way Pence handled it...
When I first heard about this, I had not been... I didn't get the whole story.  I was first told about it that what happened was the actors had told Pence that they didn't approve, they didn't support him and that he scared them and that they were terribly afraid and that everybody's terribly afraid.  But nobody told me what Pence did.  What Pence did... He didn't say anything. He left the theater as he was leaving the theater, he looked to his son and said, "Son, that's the sound of freedom," meaning people can say what they want and everybody else can judge whether or not it's in good taste or what have you.
But as I say, folks, in the end, it's helpful that people are finally able now to see who these people have always been.
RUSH:  Did I say Pence said to his son? It was to his daughter and her cousin. He said, "That's the sound of freedom." 

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